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Do you have a friend, professor, or neighbor who claims to take the moral high-road, yet stubbornly defends abortion?  Take a breath, and keep your composure.  Don’t make statements; rather, ask questions.

Mike Adams (Townhall.com 3/7/2011) offers 35 questions he gleaned in large part from Scott Klusendorf (www.prolifetraining.com).  Here are 18 of those questions:

  1. If abortion is not murder because the fetus is not a person then why make it “safe, legal, and rare”?
  2. If a woman were raped and got pregnant, which one would you kill: a) the baby, b) the rapist, or c) both?
  3. Are you comfortable with the fact that “a” is the only answer you  may choose according to (the present interpretation of) the Constitution?
  4. Abortion advocates frequently focus on the size of the fetus.  Why is that relevant?
  5. Do tall people have more rights than short people?
  6. Is murder permissible when the victim is sleeping and hence unaware of the surrounding environment?
  7. Should a woman abort a baby because it may be expensive and time-consuming to raise a child to adulthood?
  8. Should a woman be able to kill a puppy because it may be expensive and time consuming to feed and care for a dog?
  9. What gives human beings more value than dogs?
  10. Who do we expect better behavior from humans than from dogs?
  11. Which one of these is not like the others: a) Adult, b) toddler, c) unborn baby, d) dog?
  12. Does secular humanism assume that humans are inherently different from other life forms?  If not, why is it called humanism?
  13. Can a thoroughly materialistic (or Darwinist or secular humanist) worldview explain how or why anything has value or a right to life?
  14. Does the “right to choose” come from man or from God?
  15. If man grants rights can he also take them away?
  16. It has been said (by three Supreme Court Justices) that “At the heart of liberty is the right to define one’s own concept of existence, of meaning, of the universe, and of the mystery of human life.”  Does that mean a woman can define a baby’s rights out of existence because a woman is more powerful than a baby?
  17. Or does that mean a man can define a woman’s rights out of existence because, in a patriarchal society, a man is more powerful than a woman?
  18. Rights often confer power.  Should power also confer rights?

A long time ago, I learned the wisdom of asking questions.  Questions don’t condemn.  They just help people think.

I want to be a thinking person, don’t you?  (Thanks Mike!  Thanks Scott!)

(Mike Adams is a criminology professor at the University of North Carolina and author of Feminists Say the Darndest Things: A Politically Incorrect Professor Confronts “Womyn” On Campus.  Scott Klusendorf is a Summit Ministries faculty member and vibrant pro-life advocate.)

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Every two weeks or so, I compile a two-page bulletin insert entitled “Christian Citizenship.”  The purpose is to help members of our congregation become aware of human care issues that beg a response from Christian citizens.  I’m very disappointed to hear that the insert is upsetting to some.  “We shouldn’t be putting this in our bulletin,” said one.  “We can’t talk about these things,” said another.

What things?  The topics highlighted in “Christian Citizenship” include abortion, stem cell research, euthanasia, creation/evolution, health care insofar as funding abortion or Planned Parenthood is concerned, marriage and family, same sex “marriage,” homosexuality, and persecution of Christians.  I take special care to focus only on those issues where God’s Word speaks.  And, to make sure I stay on track, I submit every edition to my pastor for his approval or suggested changes.

I’m disappointed that some Christians are upset, but I’m not surprised.  Years of experience in Lutherans For Life have taught me that too many Lutherans specifically and Christians in general consider abortion, for example, as a “political issue.”  Abortion is not a political issue.  It’s a moral issue.  And God speaks to it: “Thou shalt not kill.”   A younger generation, more pro-life than their parents, acknowledges that abortion ends the life of a baby.  They’ve seen the ultrasound images.  They know that a baby’s heart begins beating 18-24 days after conception and brain waves are present at 43 days.  Lutheran students learn in confirmation classes that God “knits [us] together in [our] mother’s womb (Psalm 139:13b).  Roe vs. Wade may have legalized abortion and the media may try to politicize it, but only God can create life; therefore, only God can take that life.  Abortion is a moral issue and because God speaks about protecting the human life He has made, we must, too.

Jesus said, “You are the salt of the earth, but if salt has lost its taste, how shall its saltiness be restored?  It is no longer good for anything except to be thrown out and trampled under people’s feet.  You are the light of the world.  A city set on a hill cannot be hidden.  Nor do people light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on a stand, and it gives light to all in the house” (Matthew 5:13-15).  The Christian is called to be “salt and light” in this world where many wrong things — like abortion — are called right.

If discussions of morality, i.e. abortion or same-sex “marriage,” can’t be had in the church, does it follow that we can’t talk about issues of faith outside the church?

To be continued in another “post”… on the journey.

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